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For all walks in National Parks or other managed areas the walks are classified by the Australian Walking Track Grading System.

Key to track standards

(From the Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing website)

The classification system is based on Australian Standards. Please note that while each track is classified according to its most difficult section, other sections may be of an easier level.

 Class 1 track 
  • No bushwalking experience required.
  • Flat even surface with no steps or steep sections.
  • Suitable for wheelchair users who have someone to assist them.
  • Walks no greater than 5km.
  • Wheelchair access track with handrails at lookout.

Class 2 track

  • No bushwalking experience required.
  • The track is hardened or compacted surface and may have a gentle hill section or sections and occasional steps.
  • Walks no greater than 10km.
 Class 3 track 
  • Suitable for most ages and fitness levels.
  • Gently sloping, well-defined track with some exposed roots and rocks.
  • Caution required near unfenced cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.
  • Reasonable level of fitness required and ankle-supporting footwear recommended.
Class 4 track 
  • Bushwalking experience recommended
  • Rough distinct tracks with exposed roots and rocks with steep grades and extensive steps.
  • May be extensively overgrown; hazards such as fallen trees and rockfalls likely to be present.
  • Caution at creek crossings, unfenced cliff edges and naturally occurring lookouts.
  • Moderate fitness level and ankle-supporting footwear strongly recommended.
 Class 5 track 
  • Very experienced bushwalkers with specialised skills, including navigation and emergency first aid.
  • These trails are not constructed or maintained by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS), National Parks, Sport and Racing (NPSR).
  • No signs or markers are provided, except where necessary to minimise environmental damage. Depending on usage levels trails may range from clearly visible footpads to indistinct, overgrown routes.
  • Trails may range from clearly visible footpads to indistinct, overgrown routes depending on usage levels.
  • Muddy sections, steep grades and numerous hazards such as fallen trees and rockfalls are highly likely to be encountered.
  • Caution required—no safety fences, bridges or other structures provided.
  • Highly developed navigational skills and relevant topographic maps essential.
  • High fitness level and extensive off-track walking experience and ankle-supporting footwear essential.

 

 

For background information this is a good resource:  http://www.depi.vic.gov.au/forestry-and-land-use/visiting-parks-and-forests/visiting-state-forests/activities/australian-walking-track-grading-system

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